Colorado Dominates Outside Magazine’s 2018 Best Places to Work

Nearly half of the companies listed on Outside Magazine’s 2018 50 Best Places to Work call Colorado home – 23 to be exact. And 65 percent of the Colorado businesses are in the Boulder-Denver metro area – 15 in total – leading with No. 3 ranked Whipplewood CPAs in Littleton.

Outside Magazine’s editorial staff says health-oriented perks matter and adds, “It’s a commitment to fun and supportive work environments that really make these companies stand apart.”

 

Here’s a sampling of the perks offered by the 15 Boulder-Denver metro area companies listed:

 

3. Whipplewood CPAs (Littleton)

Whipplewood supports employees through the long hours of tax season with professional massages and year round stress-relief like a meditation and power naps and hikes on a private trail system.

6. BSW Wealth Partners (Boulder)

Perks at this financial advisory firm include Colorado skiing, craft beer in the fridge, and a paid three-month sabbatical at ten years of employment. The firm moved up from No. 39 on last year’s list.

8. GroundFloor Media (Denver)

The plan at this midsize advertising, public relations and marketing firm is simple: give employees a sum to put toward gym memberships, fitness classes, and outdoor recreation. Last year GroundFloor was No. 2.

9. Choozle (Denver)

The digital advertising software company offers flexible Fridays, yearly summer camping trip, and team trips to Breckenridge. Four-year employees get two months paid-time-off.

11. Avid4 Adventure (Boulder)

While creating summer camps for kids, employees receive monthly outings to local trails, free gear rentals and bike tune-ups, gym memberships, and a stipend to complete a dream adventure. The company jumped from No. 25 last year.

15. Asia Transpacific Journeys (Boulder)

Employees of this travel and tour agency enjoy flexible and remote scheduling, plus discounts on airfare, hotels, guides, car rentals, and trains.

16. TDA Boulder (Boulder)

Ad agency employees can earn $1,000 for the charity of their choice. But it’s no walk in the park. To qualify, staffers climb a Colorado 14er. TDA held the No. 36 ranking on last year’s list.

17. SmartEtailing (Boulder)

As providers of websites, marketing, and integrations for independent bike shops, perks include contributions of $100 to $200 toward the purchase of a bike frame every three years.

27. Pairin (Denver)

Pairin’s software products are for professional development and hiring. They walk the talk of professional development with employees coached to grow professionally and personally.

28. Sterling-Rice Group (Boulder)

Sterling Rice provides its advertising and public relations pros with extra PTO for competing in the 200-mile Ragnar Relay. Throw in an all-company powder day, company bikes, and on-site massage, and acupuncture, and you can see why Sterling-Rice rose from No. 35 last year.

30. Bonusly (Boulder)

As creators of recognition and rewards software for enriching company culture, Bonusly supports fitness for employees as well as kombucha on tap and flexibility that empowers employees to organize outings.

34. Turner (Denver)

Employees of this public relations, social media, and digital communications firm engage in “sweatworking platforms,” such as skiing, cycling, and sailing with clients and journalists.

36. CampMinder (Boulder)

Employees build web-based platforms and solutions for summer camp operators. Perks reflect the core value to “give joy,” including events to unwind and have fun.

44. GoSpotCheck (Denver)

GoSpotCheck creates management software for improving workforce operations. Benefits include unlimited PTO, catered Friday breakfasts, dog-friendly office and an annual retreat in the Rockies.

47. Mondo Robot (Boulder)

This creative digital agency jumped from No. 83 last year. Perks include three weeks PTO, a $300 wellness benefit, annual brew tour, loaner bikes, pet-friendly office, and an annual snow day at Arapahoe Basin Ski Area.

 

Other Colorado companies on Outside’s top 50 outside across the state:

4. Adaptive Sports Center (Crested Butte)

20. Backbone Media (Carbondale)

32. JRF Ortho (Centennial)

35. Powder7 (Golden)

37. Koru (Carbondale)

41. Bluetent (Carbondale)

42. Ascent360 (Golden)

50. SummitCove Vacation Lodging (Keystone)

 

See more company details at https://www.outsideonline.com/2357581/50-best-places-work-2018

 

Originally posted here by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Wednesday, November 21st, 2018 at 11:18am.

Posted on November 22, 2018 at 4:52 pm
Jay Kalinski | Category: Articles, RE/MAX of Boulder | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Boulder County Home Sales Soar into Late Summer

Home sales in Boulder-area single-family and attached housing markets rose in August along with the late summer heat index.

Single-family home sales increased 10 percent in August 2018 compared to July with 460 homes sold in Boulder-area markets vs. 418. Sales for condominiums and townhomes climbed 15 percent with 146 units sold vs. 127.

Meanwhile, Denver-metro home sales went in the opposite direction, slowing significantly over the same period, according to the Denver Post.

It’s testament to the state of Boulder Valley real estate market, according to Ken Hotard, senior vice president of public affairs for the Boulder Area Realtor® Association.

“We have our own little market here. While Denver dipped, Boulder Valley showed strong growth in sales, despite ongoing rising prices and inventory squeeze,” says Hotard.

Year-to-date sales also continue to climb steadily. Single-family home sales grew 1.7 percent through August 2018 compared to last year – 3,154 homes sold vs. 3,100. Attached homes followed a similar track, improving 1.6 percent year-to-date – 1,154 sold in 2018 compared with 1,135 in 2017.

Inventory dropped 2.0 percent for single-family homes – 993 units in August 2018 vs. July’s 1,013. But condo/townhomes available for sale grew 11.2 percent with 268 units available in August vs. 241 the previous month.

Hotard attributes the unceasing increase in real estate sales and prices to the area’s strong economy and continued job growth, along with a desirable quality of life. “Significant companies are hiring in Boulder, like Zayo, Google, Twitter – and the natural foods industry is strong,” he adds.

Interest rates are slowly pushing upward, which traditionally results in a slowdown in rising home prices and sales. But Boulder Valley’s housing market may not readily respond to interest rate increases.

“It’s unknown what the tipping point is for interest rates affecting our housing market. And with 35 percent of Boulder County homes bought with cash, rising interest rates may not have a significant effect locally,” says Hotard.

Looking ahead to the final quarter of the year, Hotard expects sales to continue to match those of last year, unless “something unusual happens.”

“We seem to be operating on an upward trend and it’s hard to see what would stop it. The real challenge for Boulder County is providing the housing and transportation infrastructure to support job growth.”

 

Originally posted here by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Tuesday, October 2nd, 2018 at 10:46am.

Posted on October 4, 2018 at 10:59 pm
Jay Kalinski | Category: Articles, RE/MAX of Boulder | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

3 trends that could ruin your home sale plans this summer

Sellers in the Front Range housing market enjoyed a blistering spring season.  Everything seemed to be breaking in favor of sellers — brisk appreciation, multiple offers, favorable terms, and generally quick sales.  However, several trends are emerging that could derail (or at least diminish) a seller’s summer home sale plans.  Here are three of the biggest trends likely to affect our summer market:

1. Rising Interest Rates. For the past several years, economists have been predicting that interest rates will rise from their historic lows (in the 3.5 percent range for a 30-year conventional fixed mortgage).  It turns out that  the eggheads finally got it right. Compared to this time two years ago, interest rates are at least a percent higher — and with the Fed raising their Funds Rate again at their last meeting (and with more raises on the horizon), it seems that even higher rates are coming. It seems now is an appropriate time to refer back to my article discussing the 1 percent Equals 10 Percent Rule, which is a rule of thumb that for each 1 percent increase in mortgage rates, your buying power decreases about 10 percent.  When you consider this with the fact that average home prices in Boulder County have risen about 21 percent in the past two years, it means that the same buyers from two years ago can now afford 31 percent less than they could have back then. 

If you’re thinking, “but I’m a seller, it doesn’t affect me.”  Think of it in these terms: that pool of buyers who would have bought your 2,000 square-foot, three-bedroom house two years ago? They can now only afford a 1,380 square-foot, two-bedroom condo.  That is, the pool of buyers for your home is significantly smaller today.

2. The market hates uncertainty.  To say this has been the least conventional presidency of the modern era is an understatement.  Setting aside the human side of the geopolitical uncertainty caused by the Trump administration (alienating the G7, backing out of the UN Human Rights Council, separating families at the border, etc.), the president has decided to wage trade wars on multiple fronts. And while these acts might be appeasing his base, they are starting to have a negative effect on the economy.  As of mid-June, the stock market has given back all of the gains it made in 2018, due in large part to the trade wars started with China and other countries.  Speaking of China, its investments in the United States have dropped 92 percent this year, and less foreign cash means less money to invest in the housing market.

The effect of this is straightforward — when people feel uncertain and less wealthy (i.e., watching their  world turn topsy-turvy and stock portfolios drop), they are less willing to take risks and make changes. And while home ownership might be the best investment you’ll make, it still represents a risk, especially if you’re a first time home buyer. Thus, the uncertainties in the economy will produce fewer buyers than a steadily rising market.

3. What the frac? The fracking industry in Colorado has flourished since a Colorado Supreme Court ruling in 2016 held that state laws trumped local bans and regulations limiting fracking.  In Weld County alone, there are approximately 23,000 fracking wells, and fights are currently raging over applications to drill near highly populated parts of Boulder and Broomfield counties.  Wells are being placed within 1,000 feet of schools, and this encroaching boom has generated growing health and safety related concerns, from a Colorado School of Public Health study reporting that living near fracking wells may increase the risk of cancer, to a home in Firestone that literally exploded from a leaky underground pipeline.

As the concerns grow, so will buyers’ reservations about buying homes near fracking, which could slow demand in these areas.  Longmont took the extraordinary step of paying two oil and gas companies $3 million to leave town and prevent future drilling.  To be sure, there are competing property rights at issue, but if compromises are not reached that make people feel safe, then homeowners could see their home values fall.

In sum, our market has been red hot this spring, but there are issues on the horizon that could dampen summer sales prospects.  Some of these are likely beyond our direct control, but I encourage you to make your voice heard where you feel you can make a difference.  Your home’s equity (and your conscience) will thank you.

 

Jay Kalinski is broker/owner of Re/Max of Boulder.

Originally posted by BizWest on Wednesday, June 1st, 2018. Original found here.

Posted on June 28, 2018 at 5:15 pm
Jay Kalinski | Category: Articles, BizWest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Boulder’s average single-family home price surpasses $1.2M

This 4,987-square-foot home on Boulder Creek was featured in Bizwest’s Distinctive Homes of the Boulder Valley in April 2016. According to Zillow.com it sold in May 2017 for $3,495,000.

 

At the close of 2017, many were speculating that Boulder had finally reached a price ceiling at the limits of people’s purchasing power. The speculation continued that prices in Boulder would level off for some significant period of time as the city waited for buyers to accumulate more savings, wages to rise, etc. After all, approximately 40 percent of the homes sold in Boulder were over $1 million last year, so surely the pool of buyers able to buy a million dollar home must be depleted, right? The first quarter of 2018 has largely disproven that theory.

The average single family home price in Boulder reached $1,207,403 by the end of March, which represents a whopping 21 percent increase over the same period last year. Anecdotally in my real estate sales practice this year, I have seen multiple homes listed over $1.3 million ultimately sell for at least $200,000 over asking price. On the seller side, it is a cause for celebration, as the next chapter of their lives will be unexpectedly more comfortable. On the buyer side, it can be incredibly frustrating and demoralizing to save for a major purchase, believe you are well-positioned to make your dream come true, only to have the finish line moved forward on you. When you include the fact that about one quarter of the city’s recent home purchases have been cash transactions — and mortgage interest rates are a full point higher than last year — you begin to understand the size of the challenge facing buyers.

Looking back to 2008, you can see that home prices have almost doubled in the last 10 years (see City of Boulder chart).

Looking back even further to 1978 (see Appreciation chart), one can see that this appreciation trend is not an anomaly in Boulder. In fact, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency, Boulder County has appreciated more than anywhere else in the country going back to 1991.

I have used earlier versions of the chart [to the right] in previous articles to try to assess when our current appreciation cycle would level off. Back then, I noted that the pattern going back to 1978 would have predicted that our appreciation cycle would have ended in mid-2017. I further stated, however, that there were factors present today that were not issues previously, the most prominent of which being that Boulder has almost reached full build-out under current zoning regulations.  That is, we are much closer to running out of land now, which will continue to put upward pressure on existing homes.

 

What does all of this mean?

Crossing the $1.2 million threshold means that Boulder is becoming disconnected from the surrounding cities. Some call it becoming a “resort market” like Aspen, others compare it to Silicon Valley (Nerdwallet published a study in support of this assertion, wherein in Boulder was listed in the top five least affordable housing markets, along with San Francisco, Silicon Valley, Honolulu and San Diego). However you characterize the situation, it is becoming clear that this is not an aberration and the challenges facing buyers will likely continue to mount as summer approaches.

 

Jay Kalinski is broker/owner of Re/Max of Boulder.

Originally posted by BizWest on Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018. Original found here.

Posted on May 3, 2018 at 3:52 pm
Jay Kalinski | Category: Articles, BizWest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,