Boulder Housing Sales Seem Unstoppable

Boulder County housing sales in May rolled strong once again, demonstrated by sharp growth in the single-family home market and solid performance for attached dwellings.

“Gains in single-family home sales topped 40 percent – a really strong increase that was backed by inventory growth,” says Ken Hotard, senior vice president of public affairs for the Boulder Area Realtor® Association.

In fact, all categories of single-family homes surged, according to May 2018 statistics. Sales of single-family homes grew 41.2 percent in May 2018 compared to April, with 487 homes sold vs. 345. Year-to-date single-family home sales increased 5.6 percent year-to-date through May 2018 compared to the prior year – 1,708 vs. 1,618. And inventory countywide increased 19.1 percent month-over-month with 918 units for sale in May vs. 770 the prior month.

Condominium and townhome sales grew a solid 14.3 percent in May compared to April, represented by 144 units sold vs. 126. Year to date, growth was 23 percent – 594 units vs. 481. Inventory increased 27 percent in May compared to April, putting 208 dwellings in the May marketplace compared to 163 in April.

Hotard says prices moderated slightly in May. Single-family average and median sales prices dropped compared to the previous month. “The median in April was over $1 million, now it’s down to $985,000; and townhome/condos were in the $500,000’s last month and are now in the $450,000’s,” he adds.

The steadily increasing housing market is a sign of strong fundamentals – demand is strong, inventory tight and jobs plentiful. Currently, Boulder is the third largest job center in the state. “But with housing prices too high for the average worker and no new building in sight, we can expect to see jobs that would have located in Boulder County opt instead to land somewhere along I-25,” explains Hotard.

Looking forward, he says June data seems to be tracking solidly along with May.

“We should see a shift in the market as we get to the end of July. I expect it to slow down a bit, but we can expect much of the same.”

He adds that the number of days a home is on the market is short. “Any buyer in this market has to walk into house-hunting ready to buy with a knowledgeable realtor and financing lined up.”

 

Originally posted here by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Wednesday, June 27th, 2018 at 11:03am.

Posted on June 30, 2018 at 11:51 am
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Boulder’s average single-family home price surpasses $1.2M

This 4,987-square-foot home on Boulder Creek was featured in Bizwest’s Distinctive Homes of the Boulder Valley in April 2016. According to Zillow.com it sold in May 2017 for $3,495,000.

 

At the close of 2017, many were speculating that Boulder had finally reached a price ceiling at the limits of people’s purchasing power. The speculation continued that prices in Boulder would level off for some significant period of time as the city waited for buyers to accumulate more savings, wages to rise, etc. After all, approximately 40 percent of the homes sold in Boulder were over $1 million last year, so surely the pool of buyers able to buy a million dollar home must be depleted, right? The first quarter of 2018 has largely disproven that theory.

The average single family home price in Boulder reached $1,207,403 by the end of March, which represents a whopping 21 percent increase over the same period last year. Anecdotally in my real estate sales practice this year, I have seen multiple homes listed over $1.3 million ultimately sell for at least $200,000 over asking price. On the seller side, it is a cause for celebration, as the next chapter of their lives will be unexpectedly more comfortable. On the buyer side, it can be incredibly frustrating and demoralizing to save for a major purchase, believe you are well-positioned to make your dream come true, only to have the finish line moved forward on you. When you include the fact that about one quarter of the city’s recent home purchases have been cash transactions — and mortgage interest rates are a full point higher than last year — you begin to understand the size of the challenge facing buyers.

Looking back to 2008, you can see that home prices have almost doubled in the last 10 years (see City of Boulder chart).

Looking back even further to 1978 (see Appreciation chart), one can see that this appreciation trend is not an anomaly in Boulder. In fact, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency, Boulder County has appreciated more than anywhere else in the country going back to 1991.

I have used earlier versions of the chart [to the right] in previous articles to try to assess when our current appreciation cycle would level off. Back then, I noted that the pattern going back to 1978 would have predicted that our appreciation cycle would have ended in mid-2017. I further stated, however, that there were factors present today that were not issues previously, the most prominent of which being that Boulder has almost reached full build-out under current zoning regulations.  That is, we are much closer to running out of land now, which will continue to put upward pressure on existing homes.

 

What does all of this mean?

Crossing the $1.2 million threshold means that Boulder is becoming disconnected from the surrounding cities. Some call it becoming a “resort market” like Aspen, others compare it to Silicon Valley (Nerdwallet published a study in support of this assertion, wherein in Boulder was listed in the top five least affordable housing markets, along with San Francisco, Silicon Valley, Honolulu and San Diego). However you characterize the situation, it is becoming clear that this is not an aberration and the challenges facing buyers will likely continue to mount as summer approaches.

 

Jay Kalinski is broker/owner of Re/Max of Boulder.

Originally posted by BizWest on Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018. Original found here.

Posted on May 3, 2018 at 3:52 pm
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