November Sales Head in Opposite Directions

A tale of two markets emerged in November, as Boulder County’s single-family home sales skidded to a stop, while townhomes and condos took a significant leap forward.

Single-family home sales in the Boulder-area markets dropped 14.4 percent in November compared to October —310 vs. 362 homes—while condominium and townhome sales rose 14.5 percent—126 units vs. 110.

Yet when data for 2018’s first 11 months is considered, the two markets tracked closely together, and both appear to be slowing, according to Ken Hotard, senior vice president of public affairs for the Boulder Area Realtor® Association.

“This is the first month single-family home sales fell below last year, and condos and townhomes are only slightly ahead,” Hotard explains.

Year-to-date through November, sales of single-family homes decreased 1.4 percent compared to the prior year with 4,205 homes sold vs. 4,266. Attached home sales over the same period improved 3.3 percent – 1,445 vs. 1,399 units sold.

Inventory decreased in both housing categories, though more significantly for single-family homes, which dropped 13.1 percent in November compared to October with 821 vs. 945 Boulder County homes for sale. Condo/townhome inventory fell 6.1 percent in November compared to the previous month with 263 units for sale vs. 280.

“My guess is the growth of the townhome/condo market is due to a larger inventory and more affordable pricing,” says Hotard. “Interest rates are making people jumpy, but the reality is that mortgage rates are still historically low. The more complete view is the inventory and pricing dynamics of the Boulder-area markets.”

He notes that single-family home sales could recover in December, but it’s not likely.

“We have the ongoing headwinds of low inventory and rising prices. When we look back, we’ll see 2018 as market slowdown for housing in our market areas,” Hotard predicts.

Despite the slow-down in housing, Colorado’s economy continues to show strength, wage growth is increasing, and gross domestic product is up, according to recent news reports.

“What the Boulder-area needs is more housing that is desirable and more affordable for people,” adds Hotard.

 

Originally posted here by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Thursday, January 3rd, 2019 at 10:13am.

Posted on January 3, 2019 at 11:13 pm
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Boulder’s Economic Confidence Highest in U.S.

Boulder leads the nation for the most positive economic outlook, followed by two other Colorado cities in the top 10 — No. 3 Fort Collins and No. 9 Denver. According to the recent survey by Indeed.com, a positive economic outlook is driven largely by where you live more than by a national or political view of a national economy.

Colorado is the only state with three cities in Indeed’s top 10. Smaller mountain-state metro area residents performed well when surveyed about the economy and their personal outlook. Tech hubs also fared well, such as the San Francisco Bay Area, Austin, and Raleigh.

The following 10 U.S. cities have the highest economic confidence, according to Indeed.com:

  1.      Boulder, CO
  2.      Provo-Orem, UT
  3.      Fort Collins, CO
  4.      San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA
  5.      Boise, ID
  6.      Ann Arbor, MI
  7.      San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA
  8.      Austin, Round Rock, TX
  9.      Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO
  10.      Raleigh, NC

For the 2,000 American adults nationwide surveyed on politics and attitudes about the economy, local economic conditions such as lower unemployment, faster job growth, and a more educated workforce correlate with local economic confidence.

Nine percent describe their regional economic conditions as excellent and 51 percent say their economies are good. To analyze the local influence on economic perspective, Indeed combined answers to survey questions with data on local job markets. Five factors were found to drive local economic confidence:

  1. Personal finances – 81 percent of respondents rate their personal financial situation as excellent or good and say the same about local economic conditions.
  1. National economic view – 83 percent who rate national economics as excellent or good say the same about local economic conditions. The survey found that views of the national economic situation are also strongly influenced by politics, with 73 percent of Republicans and 43 percent of Democrats rating national economic conditions excellent or good.
  1. Local unemployment rate – Respondents in areas with lower unemployment rates have a more positive economic outlook. The outlook is likely driven by the view that a lower unemployment rate results in more job opportunities and bargaining power for workers, which should translate into faster wage growth.
  1. Higher local job growth – Job growth where you live means expanding opportunities and rising home prices. The majority of homeowners like this combined dynamic.
  1. Highly educated populations – For those who live in areas where a larger percentage of adults have a college degree – such as the Denver-metro area – there is a correlation with higher earnings and more spending power. 

People are more optimistic when they live in places that are doing well economically. That holds true for those who live in Colorado where unemployment rates continue to be among the lowest in the nation and job growth remains strong.

Yahoo Finance articlehttps://finance.yahoo.com/news/10-u-s-cities-highest-economic-confidence-170140863.html

Indeed’s full report at: https://www.hiringlab.org/2018/11/27/local-economic-confidence/

 

Originally posted here by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Tuesday, December 18th, 2018 at 10:18am.

Posted on December 19, 2018 at 10:54 pm
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Leeds MBA Program Jumps 13 Points in Bloomberg Businessweek Rankings

University of Colorado Boulder Leeds School of Business ranked No. 67 for its full-time MBA program, according to Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2018 rankings. The ranking is 13 points ahead of last year’s 80th placement.

When ranked only among public universities, Leeds rose to No. 29.

In the entrepreneurship category, the school ranked No. 10 overall, reflecting its Boulder and Front Range location’s access to a vibrant entrepreneurial business community with many venture capital and startup opportunities. Along with the Deming Center for Entrepreneurship, students have a strong network of connections and resources that enables them to excel.

Leeds attributes the significant rise in Bloomberg’s ranking to recent program enhancements, increased engagement and partnerships with the business community, and new faculty hires. Over the last two years, the school added faculty from noted universities including Berkeley, Northwestern, Wharton, London Business School, and Harvard.

Recently, Leeds partnered with more than 70 key business leaders and influencers, locally and globally, to understand essential skills and attributes students will need in the 21st century workplace.

“We are very proud of this momentum,” said Dean Sharon Matusik, “But we consider it just the beginning.” Matusik credits the teaching and research ability of a world-class faculty for Leeds success. “The classroom learning combined with access to our business community—which is known around the world for being entrepreneurial, innovative and with an orientation toward creating both economic and social value—provides a distinctive educational experience that prepares our graduates to positively transform the future of business.”

This year Bloomberg modernized the ranking methodology for business schools to assess MBA program value from the perspective of graduating students, recent alumni, and recruiting companies. Assessments are organized into four categories based on importance to respondents: Compensation, Learning, Networking and Entrepreneurship.

Bloomberg senior editor, Caleb Solomon, says this lets stakeholders decide critical factors for success. Bloomberg used the results and compensation data as building blocks for calculating overall ranking. 

For more about University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business, visit https://www.colorado.edu/business/

To see Bloomberg rankings visit http://www.bloomberg.com/features/2015-best-business-schools/

 

Originally posted here by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Tuesday, December 4th, 2018 at 2:26pm.

Posted on December 8, 2018 at 9:07 pm
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Despite Monthly Swings, Boulder County Home Sales Hold a Strong Course

If there is one constant in Boulder Valley, it’s a strong real estate market. October’s sales statistics show 2018 is on track to finish strong. This is despite that month-to-month, those statistics sometimes show significant fluctuation.

Take September and October 2018. When compared to October, September’s data is like Colorado weather: If you don’t like the statistics one month, wait a month, they are likely to change.

September’s single-family sales dropped 20 percent, then recovered to gain 8.7 percent in October with 362 homes sold vs. September’s 333. Despite the short-term fluctuation, year-to-date sales are holding steady through October, reaching just one unit short of the same volume as last year – 3,880 vs. 3,881.

“It’s hard to characterize our market here in Boulder County. Given all of the factors, it can be difficult to decipher trends as opposed to an event,” says Ken Hotard, senior vice president of public affairs for the Boulder Area Realtor® Association.

“While the swings add volatility to the market, the market exhibits good health with strong demand, and prices and sales holding steady,” he says, adding that a strong economy and job growth continue to be drivers.

Condo/townhomes in Boulder County saw a month-over-month sales decrease of 5.2 percent, with 110 units sold in October compared to 116 in September. Year-to-date attached dwelling sales rose 4 percent through October – 1,317 vs. 1,266.

October’s inventory for attached dwellings also increased 7.3 percent over September with 280 units available in October compared to 261 the prior month. Single-family home inventory declined 10 percent, with 945 homes available for sale in October compared to 1,050 in September 2018.

Hotard projects November and December sales will be “anybody’s guess depending on the weather. But all things being equal, I don’t expect much change through the end of the year.”

The next big change he expects will be in early 2019. “I think we’ll see a big increase in inventory and sales in February and March. I think people will look at taking the gains we have seen in this market, providing inventory and set the market up for pretty strong increases in the big home selling months.”

 

Originally posted here by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Tuesday, November 27th, 2018 at 9:40am.

Posted on November 28, 2018 at 5:14 pm
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Colorado Dominates Outside Magazine’s 2018 Best Places to Work

Nearly half of the companies listed on Outside Magazine’s 2018 50 Best Places to Work call Colorado home – 23 to be exact. And 65 percent of the Colorado businesses are in the Boulder-Denver metro area – 15 in total – leading with No. 3 ranked Whipplewood CPAs in Littleton.

Outside Magazine’s editorial staff says health-oriented perks matter and adds, “It’s a commitment to fun and supportive work environments that really make these companies stand apart.”

 

Here’s a sampling of the perks offered by the 15 Boulder-Denver metro area companies listed:

 

3. Whipplewood CPAs (Littleton)

Whipplewood supports employees through the long hours of tax season with professional massages and year round stress-relief like a meditation and power naps and hikes on a private trail system.

6. BSW Wealth Partners (Boulder)

Perks at this financial advisory firm include Colorado skiing, craft beer in the fridge, and a paid three-month sabbatical at ten years of employment. The firm moved up from No. 39 on last year’s list.

8. GroundFloor Media (Denver)

The plan at this midsize advertising, public relations and marketing firm is simple: give employees a sum to put toward gym memberships, fitness classes, and outdoor recreation. Last year GroundFloor was No. 2.

9. Choozle (Denver)

The digital advertising software company offers flexible Fridays, yearly summer camping trip, and team trips to Breckenridge. Four-year employees get two months paid-time-off.

11. Avid4 Adventure (Boulder)

While creating summer camps for kids, employees receive monthly outings to local trails, free gear rentals and bike tune-ups, gym memberships, and a stipend to complete a dream adventure. The company jumped from No. 25 last year.

15. Asia Transpacific Journeys (Boulder)

Employees of this travel and tour agency enjoy flexible and remote scheduling, plus discounts on airfare, hotels, guides, car rentals, and trains.

16. TDA Boulder (Boulder)

Ad agency employees can earn $1,000 for the charity of their choice. But it’s no walk in the park. To qualify, staffers climb a Colorado 14er. TDA held the No. 36 ranking on last year’s list.

17. SmartEtailing (Boulder)

As providers of websites, marketing, and integrations for independent bike shops, perks include contributions of $100 to $200 toward the purchase of a bike frame every three years.

27. Pairin (Denver)

Pairin’s software products are for professional development and hiring. They walk the talk of professional development with employees coached to grow professionally and personally.

28. Sterling-Rice Group (Boulder)

Sterling Rice provides its advertising and public relations pros with extra PTO for competing in the 200-mile Ragnar Relay. Throw in an all-company powder day, company bikes, and on-site massage, and acupuncture, and you can see why Sterling-Rice rose from No. 35 last year.

30. Bonusly (Boulder)

As creators of recognition and rewards software for enriching company culture, Bonusly supports fitness for employees as well as kombucha on tap and flexibility that empowers employees to organize outings.

34. Turner (Denver)

Employees of this public relations, social media, and digital communications firm engage in “sweatworking platforms,” such as skiing, cycling, and sailing with clients and journalists.

36. CampMinder (Boulder)

Employees build web-based platforms and solutions for summer camp operators. Perks reflect the core value to “give joy,” including events to unwind and have fun.

44. GoSpotCheck (Denver)

GoSpotCheck creates management software for improving workforce operations. Benefits include unlimited PTO, catered Friday breakfasts, dog-friendly office and an annual retreat in the Rockies.

47. Mondo Robot (Boulder)

This creative digital agency jumped from No. 83 last year. Perks include three weeks PTO, a $300 wellness benefit, annual brew tour, loaner bikes, pet-friendly office, and an annual snow day at Arapahoe Basin Ski Area.

 

Other Colorado companies on Outside’s top 50 outside across the state:

4. Adaptive Sports Center (Crested Butte)

20. Backbone Media (Carbondale)

32. JRF Ortho (Centennial)

35. Powder7 (Golden)

37. Koru (Carbondale)

41. Bluetent (Carbondale)

42. Ascent360 (Golden)

50. SummitCove Vacation Lodging (Keystone)

 

See more company details at https://www.outsideonline.com/2357581/50-best-places-work-2018

 

Originally posted here by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Wednesday, November 21st, 2018 at 11:18am.

Posted on November 22, 2018 at 4:52 pm
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Exterior Renovations Deliver Best ROI

A beautiful new kitchen is often the renovation homeowners dream of. But if getting a high return on investment (ROI) is at the top of your checklist, you may want to consider doing exterior work instead.

Seven out of the ten highest payback projects are exterior renovations, according to Remodeling Magazine Cost vs. Value Report 2018. Except for a minor kitchen remodel, work done on the exterior of the house generated higher returns than did interior renovations.

Here are the five renovations that give the highest return, according to Remodeling Magazine.

Garage door replacement

A new garage door can give your home instant curb appeal. Expect to spend about $3,500 to install a new 16×7-foot windowed garage door with lifetime warranty and new heavy-duty galvanized steel tracks. Average ROI is 98.3 percent nationwide and 96.7 percent in the mountain region.

Remodeling Magazine’s mountain region includes Colorado, New Mexico, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Wyoming and Montana.

Manufactured stone veneer

Stone is a popular siding, particularly in Colorado. Adding stone to your home’s exterior gives it character and gives high payback when you sell. At a cost of $8,221, ROI in the mountain region is 93.8 percent and 97.1 percent nationwide.

Wood deck addition

Speaking of trends, inviting outdoor living areas are hot, so wood deck additions add desirability to your home. Estimated cost is $10,950. Average payback in the mountains is higher than across the nation—84 percent compared to 82.

Minor kitchen remodel

At last, we can talk about redoing the kitchen. Expect to spend $21,198 to replace some of the components in your kitchen such as fronts of existing cabinet boxes and drawers, new hardware, new energy-efficient cooktop/oven range combination and refrigerator, laminate counter tops, and flooring. Average mountain region payback is just under 84 percent, and 81 percent nationwide.

Siding replacement

A $15,072 investment to replace old warped or cracked siding with new can help sell your home. You will get around 65 percent of that back here in Colorado and almost 77 percent nationwide.

Here are the top ten renovations with the highest payback.

For the full report, visit http://www.remodeling.hw.net/cost-vs-value/2018/key-trends-in-the-2018-cost-vs-value-report

 

Originally posted here by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Wednesday, November 7th, 2018 at 2:02pm.

Posted on November 9, 2018 at 10:26 pm
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What it’s like to be a first-time homebuyer in 2018

“Ever since we moved out here, we’ve been keeping an eye on the market,” Gibson says. “We see new houses go on the market, but that for-sale sign goes down and a for-rent sign takes its place, and so we’re competing with people that have the ability to buy multiple homes just to rent them out.”

The Gibsons live just north of Boulder in the town of Longmont, Colo. The Boulder area is one of the toughest markets for first-time buyers — and the epicenter of a growing housing affordability crisis.

“The country as a whole has been generally appreciating since coming out of the recession in 2011, 2012. Boulder has definitely led the way in a lot of ways,” says RE/MAX of Boulder’s Jay Kalinski, who is also the chair-elect of the Boulder Area Realtor Association. “Since 1991, we’ve appreciated more than anywhere else in the country — I think for over 400% appreciation since then. Our average single-family house in the city of Boulder now is around $1.2 million.” (The average price of a new home in the U.S. is $377,200, as of September, according to the Census.)

Yahoo Finance visited Boulder for HuffPost’s Listen to America town hall series installment on housing affordability and to talk to residents and local officials about the issues facing potential buyers in a market that serves as a snapshot of what’s happening across the country.

When you look at the affordability index, we’re getting less and less affordable as a community,” Kalinski says. “We’re becoming more akin to something like an Aspen or a Silicon Valley, where our home prices just are not going to support people who are making an average or even a good income.”

Watch the full HuffPost Listen to America town hall for To Develop Or Preserve: A Conversation About Affordable Housing In Boulder, CO.

Boulder City Council member Jill Adler Grano, who spoke at the Listen To America town hall, has been concerned with buyers getting priced out of the Boulder market for some time. “Unless you have money from another source or a lot of money saved up — a trust fund something like that — it’s very difficult to save for that down payment,” she says.

But there are steps the city is taking to address the issue. “As a city, we’re working on a pretty aggressive affordable housing program, so we have a goal of having 10% of our housing stock be permanently affordable,” she says. “At first that was all just for people making below area median income, but now we’ve realized that middle class is actually above area median income, so we’ve added another 5% goal for those making even above area median income but still being priced out of our city.”

But that path to homeownership has its own drawbacks, Kalinski says. “On the bright side, it means you can have a home in Boulder, you can live here at a reduced rate,” he says. “The downside is you don’t get the benefits of homeownership. Your growth is capped at 3% a year, and when the rest of the city is growing it’s a 10% to 15%, you’re giving up all of that upside.”

If income-sensitive housing isn’t an option, there are other routes cash-strapped buyers can take, including a trend Kalinski calls “driving until you qualify” that’s popular in the Boulder area. “First-time home buyers can either look a little further out or they can talk to their friends and family about trying to get a bigger down payment together to get into a market-rate home,” Kalinski says.

As for the Gibsons, they’re pressing ahead and trying to maintain a positive outlook. “I walk my dog around a lot and look at for-sale signs, look at ads, just trying to get an idea of what the market is,” Gibson says. “And hope that our hopes aren’t dashed when we get into a bidding war with about 10 other couples that are also trying to buy the same home.”

Follow Ned Ehrbar on Twitter.

Originally posted here on Yahoo Finance.

Posted on November 7, 2018 at 11:34 pm
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Colorado Economy Resurges, Adds Thousands More Jobs

Colorado’s economy continues to expand in 2018, even after signaling a slowdown at the beginning of the year. Job growth was revised upward to 2.4 percent growth for the year, according to the mid-year economic report from the Leeds Business Research Division at the University of Colorado Boulder.

The rebound follows a slowing of employment growth last September to less than 1.9 percent – the lowest level in almost six years. In June 2018, job growth increased 2.8 percent year-over-year.

The increase means about 15,000 more jobs than expected will be added through 2018, bringing the total to 62,000 new jobs by the end of the year.

The state’s gross domestic product also rose 4.5 percent year-over-year for first quarter 2018. The increase shows Colorado’s economy is continuing to grow after slowing to just 1.4 percent in 2016— the lowest level since 2010. Economic output rose to 3.6 percent in 2017.

Meanwhile, Colorado still has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the nation, logged in June 2018 at 2.7 percent. While fewer people have been moving to Colorado – dropping from 67,781 in 2016 to 46,626 in 2017 – more Coloradans are going into the labor force. The increase in workers has enabled continued employment growth, despite the decrease of people moving to the state.

Sectors leading the way in job growth are natural resources and mining, and construction.

Natural resources and mining have shown strong employment growth, according to Business Research Division Executive Director Richard Wobbekind. “Energy prices are obviously factoring into it,” Wobbekind notes.

The construction industry is “finally back to the same level of employment that they were at pre-recession.  They are really mostly constrained by lack of available workforce,” he says.

While a shortage of skilled labor continues to challenge the construction industry, Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows construction employment across the state was 171,200 in June 2018, a 5.2 percent year-over-year increase. This surpasses the last peak of 170,100 in July 2007. Average annual pay for construction workers was $59,446 in 2017, slightly above the average Colorado pay of $56,916.

Agriculture’s outlook is not as robust, however. Drought, wildfires, and low prices are slowing growth. For example, corn prices have declined more than 30 percent from five years ago.

“It’s a tough road to hoe in some of the rural areas,” Wobbekind said.

Read the full Mid-Year Economic Update at https://www.colorado.edu/business/2018/08/17/state-economy-adding-thousands-more-jobs-expected-report-predicts

 

Originally posted here by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Wednesday, October 31st, 2018 at 11:01am.

 

Posted on November 2, 2018 at 11:10 pm
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Three Colorado Cities Claim Smokin’ Hot Zip Codes

Colorado Springs’ 80922 zip code is the No. 2 spot hottest zip code in the country – moving up from No. 7 in 2017, according to analysis of 32,000 zip codes by realtor.com®.

The annual analysis of zip codes looks at how long it takes homes to sell and how frequently properties in each zip code are viewed to determine which zip codes are most popular and fastest moving.

Greeley’s 80631 and Broomfield’s 80021 zip codes also ranked in the top 50 hottest, coming in at Nos. 44 and 48 respectively.

High-income millennials helped fuel a 10 percent rise in how fast homes sold in popular areas in 2018. More and more millennials are getting older and buying homes, which realtor.com says is driving demand in smaller, more affordable suburban areas. These 25- to 34-year-olds are attracted to affordability, strong local economies, and outdoor and cultural amenities.

The number of households in Colorado Springs grew 21 percent from 2010-2018. Homes in El Paso County sell in 15 days with a median list price of $297,811 – an increase of 9.7 percent in the last year. Located 60 miles south of Denver, Colorado Springs offers lifestyle features millennials want – outdoor activities, popular local breweries, and more affordable housing than Denver.

Here are the top ten hottest zip codes in the U.S.

Homes in the top 10 hottest markets sell in 20 days on average, 46 days faster than the rest of the country, 25 days faster than their respective metro areas, and 18 days faster than their respective counties.

In eight out of the top 10 ZIPs, millennial median household income is 1.3 times higher than the national median, $78,000 versus $60,000, respectively. Mortgage originations in nine of the top 10 counties are millennial-dominated with 34 percent of mortgage originations.

For the full report visit https://www.realtor.com/research/hottest-zip-codes-2018/

 

Originally posted here by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Wednesday, October 24th, 2018 at 2:19pm.

Posted on October 25, 2018 at 7:07 pm
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Proposition 110 better serves Boulder Valley

Since Boulder’s anti-growth sentiments seem not to be going anywhere anytime soon, the condition of our roadways has become increasingly important to our economy in general and to commuters in particular.  The worse the condition of our roads, the longer commutes take and the more money commuters have to spend on auto maintenance — and the less attractive Boulder Valley becomes to workers (and employers). If you have spent any time traveling around Boulder and Broomfield counties, you know our roads are in a sad state of disrepair.  As much as I cast a skeptical eye at many of the proposed tax increases we are asked to consider, something must be done to fix our roads and support the continued vitality of our region.

There are two transportation funding propositions on the ballot this fall, and one of them — Let’s Go, Colorado (Proposition 110) — deserves your vote.

If Proposition 110 passes, there would be a 0.62 percent sales tax over 20 years to provide money for both state and local transportation priorities.  Projected revenue from the tax is $767 million for the first year, and while that sounds like a lot of money, it pales in comparison to the $9 billion transportation funding shortfall that we are facing.

If you have lived in Boulder for a considerable time, you may well remember with consternation how we were taxed with the promise of light rail connections from Boulder Valley to Denver, only to see that money spent on building out the South Metro area’s light rail system, while we were left with nothing.  You would be forgiven for responding with an expletive the first time you heard about these new funding proposals.  However, since the light rail tax debacle, a new advocate — Commuting Solutions — has risen to champion transportation causes in our area and has worked in this case to ensure that money will be allocated to address our most important needs.  In fact, if Proposition 110 passes, Commuting Solutions (and its coalition partners) has ensured that our key local needs are included on the CDOT approved project list, with up to $915 million for the following projects:

• Colorado Highway 119 (Boulder – Longmont)

• Colorado Highway 7 (Boulder – Brighton)

• U.S. 287; Colorado Highway 66 (Longmont – Broomfield)

• 28th Street/Broadway (Boulder)

• Colorado Highway 95/Sheridan (Westminster)

• Colorado Highway 7/I-25 Interchange (Broomfield/Adams)

While I understand and appreciate the sentiment behind “Fix Our Dam Roads” (Proposition 109), our local needs are not guaranteed to be addressed and this $3.5 billion bond measure is not paid for; that is, the legislature would likely be forced to cut the state budget in other areas, causing trade-offs that many citizens might not want to make.

Our roads are in a dire state, which will negatively affect our economy, housing values, and quality of life, if not addressed. I support Let’s Go, Colorado (Proposition 110) because the time has come to repair our roads and Commuting Solutions and its partners have succeeded in ensuring that money will be allocated to projects critical to Boulder Valley if it passes.

Jay Kalinski is broker/owner of Re/Max of Boulder.

Originally posted by BizWest on Wednesday, June 1st, 2018. Original found here.

Posted on October 18, 2018 at 3:29 pm
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