Boulder Economic Summit 2018: Skilled Workers Essential to Boulder’s Future, Housing a Key Issue

Boulder County excels at attracting talented and skilled workers. But change is in the air, says futurist Josh Davies, CEO at The Center for Work Ethic Development and keynote speaker at the recent Boulder Economic Summit 2018: The Workforce of the Future.

Statistics presented by futurist Davies suggest that if the last decade rocked with rapid change on the job-front, hang on to your Smartphone – the future promises to be a rocket-ride.

And, the future starts now.

Today, Boulder County employers are going head-to-head with the rest of the world. Local businesses compete globally for highly skilled workers integral to business success, yet these workers are too few in number to fill the demand. If corrective steps aren’t taken, the worker shortage will continue and potentially worsen, predict speakers at the Summit.  Success is critical, since Boulder County’s thriving economy, vitality and quality of life depends on local businesses continuing to engage world-class, highly skilled people.

Hosted by the Boulder Economic Council (BEC) and the Boulder Chamber at CU-Boulder, the Boulder Economic Summit brought experts and hundreds of community leaders together to evaluate Boulder’s competitiveness in the global demand for talent. In breakout sessions and roundtable discussions, the group explored how education and workforce development must evolve to keep up with the impacts of automation, immigration, globalization and other forces affecting future jobs.

There Will Be Robots. Lots of Robots.

People, get ready. Futurist Davies says the robots are coming and in more ways than ever expected.

The growth will be explosive: 1.7 new industrial robots will be in use by 2020, with robots performing tasks in homes and offices – not just in manufacturing, says Davies.

In his talk, 2030: The Workplace Revolution, Davies highlighted how technology will change our jobs in the coming decade and the pressing need for skill development and preparation.

With advances in technology and creative disruption in industries, employment has shifted, explains Davies, adding that 85 percent of jobs in 2030 haven’t been created yet. By then, computers will function at the speed of the human brain. He warns that increased automation and artificial intelligence will significantly alter employment needs and businesses should be prepared.

Low-skilled and entry-level and other jobs that perform repetitive tasks will no longer be available to human workers – computers and robots will fill that need. While companies do not like to replace people with robots, if robots cost 15-20 percent less, humans will lose out.

Davies predicts retail jobs will be replaced by robots at a very high rate, even though it is the leading profession in most states. Sixteen million retail workers will need to be retrained for new jobs.

His strategies for the future are to recognize that whether tasks are cognitive or non-cognitive, repetitive tasks can be automated. To succeed, workers need to develop non-cognitive skills: problem-solving, critical thinking and empathy.

Acquiring New Skills Critical to Success

Andi Rugg, executive director of Skillful Colorado, says one-third of the American workforce will need new skills to find work by 2030.

In her talk, Understanding the Skills Gap, Rugg emphasizes that training and retraining are the path to success, not only for the coming decade, but for today. There are 6.3 million unfilled jobs in the U.S. today because there’s currently not enough talent to bridge the gap between employer requirements and the workforce.

Rugg stresses that hiring needs to become skills-based, since we are in a skills-based economy. Her statistics are hard hitting:

  • Jobs requiring college degrees exceed the number of workers who have them.
  • Seventy percent of job ads for administrative assistants ask for a college degree, but only 20 percent of administrative assistants have a college degree.
  • Only 3 in 10 adults in the U.S. have a bachelor’s degree – demand for bachelor’s degree is outstripping supply of workers who have them.
  • Only 35 percent of Boulder County’s skilled workers have a degree and Colorado ranks No. 48in the nation for the number of people of color with a degree.
  • Employers need to be more agile in hiring and realize that skills can bridge the gap.
  • Employers need to focus on skills to address inequities in the labor market.
  • Employers should also offer upskilling and lifelong learning for employees.
  • Skills-matching improves employee retention and engagement as well as reduces the time to hire and ultimately reduces turnover costs for the employer.

Housing and Transportation Keys to the Solution

In a roundtable discussion led by RE/MAX of Boulder Broker/Owner Jay Kalinski, the team tackled one of Boulder County’s looming challenges in attracting workers to Boulder County – affordable housing and transportation options that enable commuting. The group developed possible solutions to ease transportation and affordable housing issues.

Photo caption for photo above: Jay Kalinski, RE/MAX of Boulder Broker/Owner (left} leads a roundtable discussion to develop transportation and affordable housing solutions.

Learn more about the discussion in Jay Kalinski’s article in BizWest, “Where will Boulder’s workforce of the future live?” at: https://bizwest.com/2018/06/01/where-will-boulders-workforce-of-the-future-live/?member=guest

Community Collaboration

In breakout sessions and the closing plenary, discussions revolved around ways the community can address workforce and economic development by bringing together private sector businesses and industry with educational institutions and organizations, government, and nonprofits in collaboration.

Through this joint effort, our community can prepare students with the workforce skills needed in the future that cannot be automated; develop business-relevant class content; roll out real-life technical projects in classrooms; re-train workers; and offer apprenticeships, internships, and work-based learning alongside education or as standalone, all of which can help workers gain skills.

Learn more by reading the Boulder Economic Council and Boulder Chamber’s recently published “Boulder Innovation Venture Report” at: https://bouldereconomiccouncil.org/whats_new_with_the_bec/boulder-innovation-venture-report/

Posted by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Wednesday, June 20th, 2018 at 11:25am.
Posted on June 21, 2018 at 5:38 pm
Jay Kalinski | Category: RE/MAX of Boulder | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Gifts that make a world of difference

BOULDER –  There’s nothing like the magic of holidays and Share-A-Gift is dedicated to bringing that magic to every family in Boulder County.

Now in its 46th year, the good work and long legacy of Share-A-Gift is as strong as ever as businesses, citizens, and volunteers donate toys, money, and time to make the holidays happy for every family in our community.

Armed with the generosity of Boulder County and hard-working elves, a.k.a, volunteers, Share-A-Gift collects and distributes donated bikes, toys, books and clothing to cheer more than 650 families and 1,800 children who live in the Boulder Valley School District. Donations not distributed through Share-A-Gift this year will be given to other charities serving additional families and children in Colorado.

Through this extended charity, nearly 2,000 children in total received gifts from Share-A-Gift this year.

“Share-a-Gift is a wonderful example of how the people in our community support each other,” says Todd Gullette, a past-president and current board member of Share-A-Gift, and managing broker at RE/MAX of Boulder.

He’s referring to the regular folks, professionals, the city of Boulder police department, schools, clubs, and organizations who come together to bring the magic of Christmas to those who might otherwise be overlooked.

RE/MAX of Boulder lobby filled with presents generously donated by Realtors, clients, staff, and friends.

RE/MAX of Boulder is a proud supporter of Share-A-Gift. Each year, RE/MAX of Boulder encourages donations of presents for Share-A-Gift in its lobby. These gifts are generously donated by RE/MAX of Boulder Realtors, staff, clients, and friends. Among those are Realtor Patrick Dolan and his team. RE/MAX of Boulder volunteers who also help coordinate the organization’s logistics, transport donations, and work at the Share-A-Gift Toy Shoppe include Managing Broker Todd Gullette, Realtor Mary Arnold Grow, Realtor Lisa Wade, Boulder Property Network Team members including Debbie Duggan, Kelsey Jensen, and staff member Stephanie Wickstrom.

To add to the bounty, 100 Women Who Care members donated $10,000 to Share-A-Gift this year. RE/MAX of Boulder Realtors Kimberly Fels, Linda Nehls, and Lisa Wade belong to this local group of inspiring women, which raise funds for Boulder nonprofits.

Todd Gullette says, “We are so thankful to have the involvement of our community as we support families that truly need our help. Among our many partners and contributors this year, we have been very excited that the wonderful folks at the Can’d Aid Foundation supported us, and we partnered with Boulder’s Bridge House to spread some great cheer to their organization. There will be many happy families this year.”

For more information visit shareagift.org or 100womenwhocare.net.

Posted by Tom Kalinski Founder RE/MAX of Boulder on Wednesday, January 3rd, 2018 at 9:44am.

Published in the Daily Camera’s At Home section on December 29, 2017

Posted on January 18, 2018 at 9:41 am
Jay Kalinski | Category: RE/MAX of Boulder | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,